Cubes and Headaches

This was done by iterating over a grid and change the distance between the back and front of the cubes. At first the top and right were solid colors but I thought they looked better with a little texture. Thousands of points.

My son Miles looked at this and said it was giving him a headache. That or it’s the air quality right now here in Northern Minnesota.

After this first sketch, I took it and broke it. These experiments took forever to render. I’ll bet there’s a better way.

 

Back to the Insane Quiggle Machine

A couple of years ago I created a tool called “The Insane Quiggle Machine“, which was an effort to create generative art from doodles using CSS / HTML / JS. I ended up producing a coloring book with the images that this system generated. Looking back now if I’d known about Processing I would have probably used that instead of trying to reinvent the wheel. Regardless it was a thing that I made and that was that.

Now enter p5.js and I see the potential of creating generative art from small doodles again to create something random out of those elements.

Right now I have 49 small elements that are rendered onto the canvas in a random order, layering up and up. I’m thinking of coming up with different sets of images and subject matter.

Here’s the code I used to generate these with p5.js.

const wW = 10000;
const wH = 10000;
let saveCount = 0;
let images = [];
const maxIterations = 500;

function preload() {
  for (let i = 1; i <= 48; i++) {
    images.push({ id: i, img: loadImage(`images/squiggle-${i}.png`) });
  }
}

function setup() {
  createCanvas(wW, wH);
  colorMode(HSB, 359, 100, 100, 100);
}

function saveFileName()
{
  let fileName = `screenshot_i_${maxIterations}_${saveCount}.png`;
  saveCount++;
  return fileName;
}

function squiggle()
{
  const thisCurrentImg = random(images);

  push();
  translate(random(wW / 4.25, wW / 1.25), random(wH / 4.75, wH / 1.25));
  scale(random(0.125, .9));
  rotate(random(45, 180));
  if (thisCurrentImg) {
    image(thisCurrentImg.img, 0, 0);
  }

  pop();
}

function draw() {
  noLoop();
  background(0, 0, 100, 100);
  for (var i = 1; i <= maxIterations; i++) {
    squiggle();
  }

  console.log(maxIterations + ' iteration reached!');
  save(saveFileName());
}

function keyPressed() {
  if (key === 'Enter') {
    redraw();
  }

  if (key === 's') {
    save(saveFileName());
  }
}

Jumping into p5.js

After muddling my way through learning Processing River the past few weeks I have started working with p5.js. Most of the same concepts transfer over to p5.js and I feel a bit more comfortable writing Javascript than Java.

Here are a few things I messed around with last night. I started working out a vertical wave pattern on a grid and then messed with scale, rotation, and transitions to get some interesting results.